Saturday, June 30, 2012

Weekend Steam: Old Fashioned Ice Maker



Uploaded by sdrambler on Mar 19, 2010

Video of the rescue of a St Louis Corliss steam engine and ammonia compressor from KD Station/Swift Packing Company and its move to the Milwaukee Historic Railroad District in Sioux City Iowa.

Weekend Steam



OldFarmShow recently posted some new videos from the National Threshers Association. The first part of this video is interesting because it is a very old threshing machine being used. There is an apron, rather than a feeder, where a worker cuts the twine around each bundle before pushing it into the cylinder. It also has a web stacker, rather than a wind stacker, and the engine is correspondingly smaller, to match the power needs.

Friday, June 29, 2012

Mr. Completely's July e-Postal Contest!

 Squirrel season will be starting up in August, so this is a good time to check your sights and your skill to see if you'll be able to put some rodents in the frying pan.  We are going to make this an easy contest so everyone can join in the fun.

The object is to hit the kill zones marked on the squirrels without wounding any game.

Click on the photo or the squirrel target for the link to the pdf, to download and print. Shoot your target at 25 feet, (or the nearest distance at your range) with your pistol, two shots for each squirrel, for a total of ten shots per target. Each shot touching the kill zone is worth 10 points. Each shot touching a squirrel, but not touching the kill zone is minus 10 points.  If you were really out in the woods trying to bag a squirrel, you would utilize a rest to steady your shot, and that is what you should do for this contest.  Any rest from the bench or uprights is OK; your choice!

If you want to shoot the match with a rifle, shoot your target at 50 feet with your choice of rest for your rifle. Shoot twice at each squirrel. We don't want any wounded game, so dial in your sights beforehand.
Write your pistol or rifle info on the target, along with the type of sights you are using; iron, non-magnifying optics, or magnifying scope.  Use the name and/or website you want listed in the results.  We will sort them out into classes.  Shoot the contest with any pistol, rifle, or pellet gun, you want.

Scan or photograph your targets, and e-mail them to: truebluetravelinman (at) gmail (dot) com.  Try to have them sent in by the end of July, and we will post the results within a few days.

If you have any difficulty printing from Google Docs, e-mail me at truebluetravelinman (at) gmail (dot) com, and I will send you the target via e-mail.

Not My Victrola



The fellow who performs this is a rare talent, featuring a banjo in a SAD song, to great effect.

Wednesday, June 27, 2012

Bringing Out The Big Gun



We are doing lots of watering this summer to keep the hedge, trees, and the flower gardens alive. The Mrs brought out her antique Rain Mate sprinkler a few days ago, and we have had a great time sitting in the shade and listening to its music.

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

IHC Details

Here is a great running, barn fresh 4 HP IHC engine that we saw over at Evansville. It is very similar to the 5 HP IHC Titan that Gary Bahre is fixing up, only this example is hit-and-miss governed; Gary's is throttle governed.




Monday, June 25, 2012

Heavy Duty!

Back To The Old Grind!

Not A Victrola: Composer Interpretation



Pianomn199 shares a very special roll with us, of Vincent Youmans playing a medley from No, No, Nanette. I have listened to many interpretations of these songs over the years, and it is absolutely heavenly to hear the composer perform them as he envisioned them. Analog still works.

Thursday, June 21, 2012

Parts Is...


...almost parts. Gary has his castings back from the foundry. Machining will be next, then installation on the Titan.

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

77 Days and Counting Down: GBR VII Will Be Here Before You Know It!



Derek, The Packing Rat is one of the bloggers you will see at the Rendezvous, and he always does a great job as photographer and videographer for the event. This video by Derek will introduce you to many of the great folks you will meet when you attend. Click over to the Gun Blogger Rendezvous site to download your reservation form, and for hotel reservation information.

The Rendezvous is an important fund raising event for Project VALOUR-IT, which benefits wounded soldiers.  You will meet and make friends with bloggers and other folks interested in shooting, and you will have lots of fun shooting while you are there.  There is always an exciting variety of guns to see, and to shoot during the first range day, and you will learn how to shoot the Steel Challenge with Mr. Completely on the second day at the Washoe Shooting Range.  Cowboy Fast Draw is held on the final day of the Rendezvous, and it is always fun and exciting.  Hurry up and make your reservations and your travel plans so you can join in on the fun.

Many Thanks, Derek, for making this great video!

Just Off The Beaten Path


 We have been bummed out ever since the Hen House Restaurant at Okawville was torn down, and we needed a better place to stop along I-64 than the Diary Kween.  Thanks to the miracle of the Internet, an online search for restaurants near Okawville located a really great meeting and eating place; The Eagle's Nest, at Addieville.



 The Eagle's Nest is easy to find whether  you are east or west-bound.  West-bound travelers should get off at the Nashville exit, and go south one mile to Mockingbird Road, then turn west.  There is one little kink in Mockingbird Road, but you continue west to one of the intersections, and go north one mile, then proceed west again into Addieville.  Just in case you are having heavy rain when you go, proceed into Nashville, turn west on IL Hwy 15, then go north on 160.  The Eagle's nest is west of the grain elevator, and just north of the dark red smithy.


Check it out on Google Earth before you come through Southern Illinois so you can travel this little detour without getting lost.  It's well worth stopping in if it's time to eat.

Tuesday, June 19, 2012

Double Your Fun



This side-by-side can crusher runs through the supply pretty fast. You have to admire the guy who put it all together. Busy-Work machines like this are always a popular attraction at engine shows.

Monday, June 18, 2012

Call The Pickers

It's a 3/4 ton and the cab to bed appears untwisted!  From the looks of the yard, I think this fellow isn't ready to part with anything.

Saturday, June 16, 2012

Weekend Steam: Transitions

Uncle Percy was a small time thresherman in the Dahlgren community, and his little threshing machine traveled only to farms centered around his ground.  The fellow on the right is Clark Fields, and judging from his appearance, this photo was taken around 1940.  Steam engines were being phased out by this time, and Percy is pulling his threshing machine with a 15-30 McCormick-Deering tractor; note the front wheel in the corner of the photo.  The rest of the photo could have been taken from about 1906 on, when wind stackers replaced web stackers on threshers, making for impressive straw stacks, but requiring more horsepower, which in turn made for bigger steam engines.  Combined harvesters (Combines)were already coming into the marketplace when this photo was taken, and after World War II threshing rings vanished rapidly as farmers acquired modern tractors and combines.

Friday, June 15, 2012

Not My Victrola: Summer Is Icumen In!



The weather has been feeling like July,the yard is turning brown like August, and the days will start growing shorter in just a week. Pax41 uploaded this masterpiece by the Haydn Quartette, recorded in 1906.

Thursday, June 14, 2012

Crankin' It Up: Early Post In Honor of Flag Day



This is a re-post, and a few hours early, so it's up on the right day in honor of our flag.

Gotta Catch Up: Recent Videos From Ruger

I have managed to get behind posting the recent YouTube videos from Ruger. There are two new vids with Dave Spaulding, and one with Lori Petoske and Il Ling New.



Trigger Reset: Dave has some very interesting information about your accuracy during trigger pull in relation to the size of your pistol.



Carry Locations: Dave gives us plenty to think about in this discussion of pocket pistols, and how you can effectively bring one out of hiding when you need it.



Il Ling stresses safely drawing and re-holstering in this video. This is important information, and we all need to take it seriously so we don't do what Tex did.   (Language Warning if you click to Tex, but who can blame him for the bad words?)

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

Barn Quilts Are Catching On In Hamilton County!

The newest barn quilt in Hamilton County, Illinois is Gloria's, and it can be seen just north of McLeansboro on the west side of IL Hwy 242.  Gloria hired her friend Becky (A professional painter.) to create the quilt, and some very nice people with a bucket truck put it up last week.  Way To Go, Becky and Gloria!!!

Tuesday, June 12, 2012

Cleaning Brass For Reloading

We are revisiting Hickok45 to see how he preps his brass for reloading. Mr. Hickok is using Dillon equipment in these videos, and as he mentions, there are several companies who make these vibrating brass polishers.





This type of equipment takes up quite a bit of shelf space, and the vibrator makes noise for many hours while it cleans. Another option available for reloaders is an ultrasonic cleaner. They cost a bit more than the rigs like Mr. Hickok demonstrates, but they clean fast, and you don't have to worry about toxic dust when you clean up. When a batch is done, put the brass in your oven on low heat for a while to dry it, then it is ready to go to your loading press.

Monday, June 11, 2012

Great Tamales In St. Louis!


We just feasted on pork, beef, and pineapple tamales that can't be beat.  Google Mami's address, and park in the back.  These are the real thing, made right there.  Mami's Facebook Page.

UPDATE:  Sad News; Mami's Tamales closed in December, 2012.  

Sunday, June 10, 2012

No Lazy Bones Here!



Back To The Old Grind!

Click, Close Your Eyes, And Travel To The Alps!



Fans of old music comment back and forth on YouTube; it's a small, suupportive club. lrh1966 sent the link to one of his oldest records, and I am sure you will all enjoy it. Have a listen!

Sometimes I wonder about my sanity, cranking up a phonograph every week for posting on YouTube, but comments like these (From K-K-K-Katy) keep me going:

"For my dear 75 year old mother - now with a bit of dementia......but she can still sing and remember this one well."

"   I met someone with this name and for some reason I must have heard this song and HAD to find out where it was from.  What a wonderful, fun, joyful, happy song.  I still hear over and over the K K K Katie.  And No one (even the OLDER people) could tell me where it came from.  Thanks for putting this on. "

"My mom tought this song to my sisters and I when we were children . Her grand  mom tought her mom and her mom tought her mom and my mom tought us . I tought my girls too. They say it scares them. I am now teaching my grandson. We only know the verse. I never knew this was a whole song. I hope that my family continues teaching this song forever. This is the only thing I have of my great grandma. I am 49yo. WOW this song went far. Thanks for this. "  
 
"my grandad used to always sing this to me when I was little :-)"

"   My dad sang this to me his entire life. Bless you for this posting, never heard the original. It was one of the first they got when he was a little boy and brings him back to me.  " 
   
"My granny used to sing this song to me because my name is Katy.  One of my dearest childhood memories. "    

  

Gun Blogger Rendezvous VII: Less Than Three Months Away!



It's time to send in your registration to Mr. Completely, make your travel plans, and your reservations for your stay in Reno.  The Rendezvous is just about the most fun you will ever have on a short vacation, and you will get to know some of your favorite bloggers, like shooting champs Mr. C, and Molly Smith.

Activities at the Rendezvous include a trip to Cabela's, two trips to the Washoe CountyShooting Range, Cowboy Fast Draw, Pizza Night, and the annual raffle to benefit Soldier's Angels Project Valour-IT.  You will also hear presentations by other attendees about firearms, industry, Second Amendment rights, plus lots of great visiting with your new friends.

Have a look at these photos by Derek, The Packing Rat from the 2009 Gun Blogger Rendezvous.

Crankin' It Up



The Tennessee Ten cut this record on June 7, 1923.

Snow Can Burn Your Eyes...



...well, dogs can, too.

Saturday, June 9, 2012

Weekend Steam: Durango-Silverton



Barstool100 captured some good stack and whistle talk in this video from Colorado. This train is a must for all steam fans to ride, and the season is upon us.  Click Here to go the website, and plan your trip.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

Gary Bahre Novo Update

Gary Bahre called to let us know that the Novo is very close to running condition.  He has welded the broken iron parts of the carburetor, built a buzz coil ignition system, repaired the fuel pump, cleaned out the gas tank, and make a 3 3/4" inch freeze plug for the bottom of the gas tank.  He could have purchased a factory plug in that size, but the minimum order was $100!   He has the bearings fitted, and needs to add a primer next to the sparkplug.  He is going to bolt it to some timbers before he fires it up so it doesn't walk around.  Gary expects to have it ready to crank in about two weeks, and plans to show it in August at Pinckneyville.

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

June 6, 1944

I took a walk along the historic coast of Normandy in the country of France. It was a lovely day for strolling along the seashore. Men were sleeping on the sand, some of them sleeping forever. Men were floating in the water, but they didn't know they were in the water, for they were dead.

The water was full of squishy little jellyfish about the size of a man's hand. Millions of them. In the center of each of them was green design exactly like a four-leafed clover. The good-luck emblem. Sure. Hell, yes.

I walked for a mile and a half along the water's edge of our many-miled beach. I walked slowly, for the detail on the beach was infinite.

The wreckage was vast and startling. The awful waste and destruction of war, even aside from the loss of human life, has always been one of its outstanding features to those who are in it. Anything and everything is expendable. And we did expend on our beachhead in Normandy during those first few hours.

For a mile out from the beach there were scores of tanks and trucks and boats that were not visible, for they were at the bottom of the water-swamped by overloading, or hit by shells, or sunk by mines. Most of their crews were lost.

There were trucks tipped half over and swamped, partly sunken barges, and the angled-up corners of jeeps, and small landing craft half submerged. And at low tide you could still see those vicious six-pronged iron snares that helped snag and wreck them.

On the beach itself, high and dry, were all kinds of wrecked vehicles. There were tanks that had only just made the beach before being knocked out. There were jeeps that had burned to a dull gray. There were big derricks on caterpillar treads that didn't quite make it. There were half-tracks carrying office equipment that had been made into a shambles by single shell hit, their interiors still holding the useless equipage of smashed typewriters, telephones, office files.

There were LCTs turned completely upside down, and lying on their backs, and how they got that way I don't know. There were boats stacked on top of each other, their sides caved in, their suspension doors knocked off.

In this shore-line museum of carnage there were abandoned rolls of barbed wire and smashed bulldozers and big stacks of thrown-away life belts and piles of shells still waiting to be moved. In the water floated empty life rafts and soldiers' packs and ration boxes, and myserious oranges. On the beach lay snarled rolls of telephone wire and big rolls of steel matting and stacks of broken, rusting rifles.

On the beach lay, expended, sufficient men and mechanism for a small war. They were gone forever now. And yet we could afford it.

We could afford it because we were on, we had our toe hold, and behind us there were such enormous replacements for this wreckage on the beach that you could hardly conceive of the sum total. Men and equipment were flowing from England in such a gigantic stream that it made the waste on the beachhead seem like nothing it all, really nothing at all.

But there was another and more human litter. It extended in a thin little line, just like a high-water mark, for miles along the beach. This was the strewn personal gear, gear that would never be needed again by those who fought and died to give us our entrance into Europe.

There in a jumbled row for mile on mile were soldiers' packs. There were socks and shoe polish, sewing kits, diaries, Bibles, hand grenades. There were the latest letters from home, with the address on each one neatly razored out-one of the security precautions enforced before the boys embarked.

There were toothbrushes and razors, and snapshots of families back home staring up at you from the sand. There were pocketbooks, metal mirrors, extra trousers, and bloody, abandoned shoes. There were broken-handled shovels, and portable radios smashed almost beyond recognition, and mine detectors twisted and ruined.

There were torn pistol belts and canvas water buckets, first-aid kits, and jumbled heaps of life belts. I picked up a pocket Bible with a soldier's name in it, and put it in my jacket. I carried it half a mile or so and then put it back down on the beach. I don't know why I picked it up, or why I put it down again.

Soldiers carry strange things ashore with them. In every invasion there is at least one soldier hitting the beach at H-hour with a banjo slung over his shoulder. The most ironic piece of equipment marking our beach-this beach first of despair, then of victory-was a tennis racket that some soldier had brought along. It lay lonesomely on the sand, clamped in its press, not a string broken.

Two of the most dominant items in the beach refuse were cigarettes and writing paper. Each soldier was issued a carton of cigarettes just before he started. That day those cartons by the thousand, water-soaked and spilled out, marked the line of our first savage blow.

Writing paper and air-mail envelopes came second. The boys had intended to do a lot of writing in France. The letters-now forever incapable of being written-that might have filled those blank abandoned pages!

Always there are dogs in every invasion. There was a dog still on the beach, still pitifully looking for his masters. He stayed at the water's edge, near a boat that lay twisted and half sunk at the waterline. He barked appealingly to every soldier who approached, trotted eagerly along with him for a few feet, and then, sensing himself unwanted in all the haste, he would run back to wait in vain for his own people at his own empty boat.

Over and around this long thin line of personal anguish, fresh men were rushing vast supplies to keep our armies pushing on into France. Other squads of men picked amidst the wreckage to salvage ammunition and equipment that was still usable.

Men worked and slept on the beach for days before the last D-day victim was taken away for burial.

I stepped over the form of one youngster whom I thought dead, But when I looked down I saw he was only sleeping. He was very young, and very tired. He lay on one elbow, his hand suspended in the air about six inches from the ground. And in the palm of his hand he held a large, smooth rock.

I stood and looked at him a long time. He seemed in his sleep to hold that rock lovingly, as though it were his last link with a vanishing world. I have no idea at all why he went to sleep with the rock in his hand, or what kept him from dropping it once he was asleep. It was just one of those little things without explanation that a person remembers for a long time.

The strong, swirling tides of the Normandy coast line shifted the contours of the sandy beach as they moved in and out. They carried soldiers' bodies out to sea, and later they returned them. They covered the corpses of heroes with sand, and then in their whims they uncovered them.
As I plowed out over the wet sand, I walked around what seemed to be a couple of pieces of driftwood sticking out of the sand. But they weren't driftwood. They were a soldier's two feet. He was completely covered except for his feet; the toes of his GI shoes pointed toward the land he had come so far to see, and which he saw so briefly.

From "Brave Men" by Ernie Pyle

Good D-Day film over at Curmudgeonly's Place.  Go Watch.

Take It Out!


 I was called to look at dogwood with a problem that didn't amount to much, and this decadent pin oak was on the terrace in front of the home.  I told the homeowner that she should have it removed as soon as possible; before it kills someone.  She responded that a city crew came by to remove it (At No Charge!) and she ran them off.


  A big tree like this one would cost a small fortune to remove and haul away, but keeping it for sentimental reasons can be fatal to family, neighbors, pets, and parked cars.   I soon had her convinced to go down to City Hall and tell them that she changed her mind. 


A less obvious problem in this yard is that leaner behind the family pet.  It's a silver maple, which gets very tall, and has weak wood that is prone to rotting.  The shade from the big pin oak caused the maple to lean toward the corner of the house.  It's definitely a problem that should be nipped in the bud, to save trouble and big expense in the future.  After both of these trees are gone, there will be plenty of sunlight to grow a straight, sturdy, long-lived tree.

Tuesday, June 5, 2012

I'm Easily Amused



I ran across this whirlilgig a few days ago. I felt kind of silly shooting video on it, but it is cute.

Monday, June 4, 2012

A Visit With Jack

 Jack and his wife Beth asked me to come to their farm and drop a snag for them, and after the cutting was done I had a chance to look at their barn, which was built around 1930.  Jack and Beth have been busy jacking up and patching the old building; the repairs are wood from the farm.

 I wonder if I could hire Jack to come down and work on our barn.  This new door is a sturdy beauty.

They have a new plate on top of the foundation all the way around the building now, and have most of the patching done.  They recently had an electrician come out and install lights.  We had that done to our barn as well a few months back, and it sure is nice.

Here is a video of the snag Jack had me drop for him.

Sunday, June 3, 2012

Daily Bread



Back To The Old Grind!

Crankin' It Up



I know it's Sunday, but go ahead and dance if you feel like it; I won't tell. Carl Fenton's Orchestra performs a medley (You Can Dance With Any Girl At All, Tea For Two, and Where Has My Hubby Gone Blues) from the Broadway Play, No, No, Nanette. Composed by Caesar Youmans. Played on the Old Brunswick. The cats were quiet when I did this one.

Saturday, June 2, 2012

Oldie But Goodie!



"A man hears what he wants to hear, and disregards the rest."

Weekend Steam



The Southern Indiana Antique and Machinery Club show is next weekend; June 8-10. Antique cars, tractors, gas engines, and even a steam engine or two will be on display. The show ground is just north of Evansville on the west side of Highway 41. Click Here for the club's webpage.

Friday, June 1, 2012

e-Postal Two-Fer Weekend!

Phil over at Random Nuclear Strikes has the June contest up, so click over there to print your target and study the rules.  Take Phil's target, and Danno's to shoot both contests this weekend.  You will be shooting pistols at 25 feet offhand, or rimfire rifles at 25 yards, elbows on the table.  You can shoot centerfire rifles as far out as you think you are able to score.  Phil has shot it at both 100 and 200 yards, and he will be glad to receive any entries you send in.

Note To Self...

...Go back to the house for your binoculars the next time you try to shoot with iron sights at 25 yards.  I just shot this one tonight with the rifle Dad bought for me fifty years ago.  It still shoots well, given my old eyes.  The little Ithaca was deadly on rabbits and squirrels.

Not My Victrola: New Time Slot!



We are shifting around the schedule a bit, because there doesn't seem to be enough time on Thursday evenings now to crank up the Old Brunswick. I plan to shift Crankin' It Up to Sunday A.M., which will let me put a record in the hopper Friday or Saturday night.

EMGColonel posted this delightful oldie, which is now over 100 years old.    I don't know the name of the artist, but she sure is enthusiastic.