Wednesday, April 6, 2016

Easy-To-Make No-Weld Target Stands


We bought some 12" gongs to go along with the  Redcoat Gong from Rifleman Training Targets.  I assembled this system using 1/2" re-bar and 1/2" pipe tees and nipples.  It's easy to assemble and you can leave a set assembled, minus the legs for transport to and from the range.


You can use 4' lengths of re-bar for the legs, but they will sink deep in soft springtime mud.  You can save a few bucks by making your legs out of ripped 2 X 4 scraps.  One 2' piece of re-bar will make pegs for all four legs.  Drill the holes slightly undersize so the pins don't fall out.

Our gongs are from Rifleman Training Targets.  They are made of AR 500 steel, and they are water-cut.  Be sure to check the photo gallery when you visit the website.

6 comments:

Merle Morrison said...

Very clever! What kind of collar is that on the bitter ends?

Merle

David aka True Blue Sam said...

They are 9/16 I.D collars with an Allen head set screw. They came with the hangers for the plates from Rifleman Targets. They sell a welded up jig for the legs, but they cost $30 for one stand. The pipe nipples are much less.

Merle Morrison said...

OK, thanks! I was hoping they were something simple.

Merle

David aka True Blue Sam said...

The target hangers are a well thought out assembly of parts, with a water-cut conveyor belt segment, and each comes with two of the collars. It has a grade 8 bolt with the head facing uprange. I don't know yet what a .30 cal bullet does to the head of a grade 8 bolt.

Merle Morrison said...

Going back to the IHMSA days, it will play hell with any steel less than AR500. I've seen a lot of damage out at the 200 meter ram line, and the 50 meter chickens frequently get knocked loose from the base - the weld failed.

Probably the best bet would be to not shoot anything except the targets. :) Funny guy, aren't I? I'm making reference to a typical indoor range, where I expect to see holes in the ceiling, some within a few feet of the firing line. Must have had the pistol very nearly vertical to do that. I expect that you and your family are much better shots and much more careful than that.

Merle



David aka True Blue Sam said...

I've had only one oops in more than 50 years. The hammer on Browning's BL-22 has a short spur, and it got away from me once back in the 1970's. The bullet went into the ground a few feet in front of me because I was pointing in a safe direction. I think about that when I see that some advocate lowering the bobbed hammer on a 1911 with one in the chamber. That one mistake still keeps me paranoid about gun safety more than forty years later.